Resources for Promoting Racial Justice and Eliminating Anti-Black Violence

Many of you are involved in or are following current movements around the world to promote racial justice and end systemic anti-Black violence and oppression.
Below are books, films and podcasts gathered by members of the Task Force on Inclusion and Belonging at Columbia, in partnership with Columbia Libraries, along with a list of organizations advocating for justice across the country and a Columbia conversation about race. You can use these resources to learn about and engage on these issues.
Please note: this list is updated frequently, so please check back often. Write to [email protected] with questions or recommendations.

BOOKS

All descriptions (visible when hovering on book covers below) are excerpted from the book summaries.

Films and Videos

A Conversation With Angela Davis and Nikki Giovanni
A Conversation With Angela Davis and Nikki Giovanni

Angela Davis and Nikki Giovanni join GirlTrek co-founders Morgan Dixon and Vanessa Garrison for a candid conversation sharing self-care and survival secrets passed down from generations of Black women. (Image courtesy of
GirlTrek.org.)

Black Feminism & the Movement for Black Lives
Black Feminism & the Movement for Black Lives

Hear a panel discussion on ways that Black Feminism shapes and informs the current struggles and successes. Featuring Charlene Carruthers, Reina Gossett and Barbara Smith, and sponsored by Creating Change. (Image courtesy of CreatingChange.org.)

The Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution
The Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution

This documentary tells the rise and fall of the Black Panther Party, one of the 20th-century's most alluring and controversial organizations that captivated the world's attention for nearly 50 years. (Image courtesy of IMDB.com.)

Claudia Rankine on Microaggressions
Claudia Rankine on Microaggressions

Poet Claudia Rankine and choreographer Will Rawls discuss the themes of their Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago performance What Remains, which explores how erasure and exposure shape Black American life. (Photo by John Lucas, used by permission of the photographer.)

I Am Not Your Negro
I Am Not Your Negro

In 1979, James Baldwin wrote a letter to his literary agent describing his next project, Remember This House. The book was to be a revolutionary, personal account of the lives and assassinations of three of his close friends: Medgar Evers, Malcolm X and Martin Luther King, Jr. At the time of Baldwin's death in 1987, he left behind only 30 completed pages of this manuscript. Filmmaker Raoul Peck envisions the book James Baldwin never finished. (Image courtesy of IMDB.com)

Let the Fire Burn
Let the Fire Burn

On May 13, 1985, a longtime feud between the city of Philadelphia and controversial radical urban group MOVE came to a deadly climax. By order of local authorities, police dropped military-grade explosives onto a MOVE-occupied rowhouse. Using only archival news coverage and interviews, first-time filmmaker James Osder brought to life one of the most tumultuous and largely forgotten clashes between government and citizens in modern U.S. history. (Image courtesy of IMDB.com.)

The Life and Death of Marsha P. Johnson
The Life and Death of Marsha P. Johnson

Victoria Cruz investigates the mysterious 1992 death of Black gay rights activist and Stonewall veteran, Marsha P. Johnson. The film uses archival interviews with Johnson and new interviews with Johnson's family, friends and fellow activists. (Image courtesy of Netflix.)

How to Be an Antiracist: A Conversation With Prof. Ibram X. Kendi
How to Be an Antiracist: A Conversation With Prof. Ibram X. Kendi

Columbia School of Social Work's Professor Courtney Cogburn engaged in conversation with Dr. Ibram X. Kendi, Andrew W. Mellon Professor of the Humanities and Director of the Center for Antiracist Research at Boston University and author of the New York Times bestseller How to Be an Antiracist.